Ethical Issues Related to Birth of IVF Octuplets : Not a Cause for Celebration, Doctors Warn

 

Two newspapers recently published two opinion pieces examining the ethical issues surrounding the recent birth of octuplets to a California woman, Nadya Suleman, who reportedly underwent fertility treatments. Summaries appear below.

 


~ Arthur Caplan, Philadelphia Inquirer: “Something has gone terribly wrong when a 33-year-old single woman — who has no home of her own, no job and a mother who worries her daughter is ‘obsessed’ with having children — winds up with 14 of them,” Caplan, director of the University of Pennsylvania Center for Bioethics, writes in an opinion piece. “Examining what exactly went wrong may shed some light on what ought to be done,” Caplan says, adding, “If doctors cannot prevent such shambles from recurring, then society must.” Caplan reports that Suleman became pregnant with all of her 14 children through in vitro fertilization. He writes that the “most obvious questions raised by this sad saga include: How did Nadya Suleman become a fertility patient? And how did she get eight embryos implanted when she already had six young children to care for in a tiny house, with no partner and no income?” Although “[s]ome fertility doctors would answer that it’s not their job to decide how many children a person can have,” Caplan writes that the “idea that doctors should not set limits on who can use reproductive technology to make babies is ethically bonkers.” He continues, “Society needs to discourage mega-multiple births. And it is clear what needs to be done to accomplish that.” Government “needs to get involved,” Caplan says, concluding, “Other nations, such as Britain, keep a regulatory eye on reproductive technologies and those who wish to use them, knowing their use can put kids at risk in ways that nature never envisioned. We owe the same to children born here” (Caplan, Philadelphia Inquirer, 2/6).



~ Ellen Goodman, Miami Herald:  The medical team that delivered the octuplets “expected kudos and high fives,” but “instead of smiles, they saw jaws drop,” syndicated columnist Goodman writes. She continues, “Attention turned from the doctors to the mom, from her courage to her judgment, from the medical success of this delivery team to the ethical failures of fertility treatment.” Questions about whether anyone has “a right to tell anyone else how many kids to have” and whether only women with husbands or certain income levels should have children are “questions that make us feel queasy when we are talking about old-fashioned families,” Goodman writes. She adds, “But they take on a new flavor in the unregulated wild west of fertility technology.” According to Goodman, the “heart of this case” is that “it turns out there are no laws in this country limiting the number of embryos that can be implanted in one womb.” She adds that it is “against all guidelines to implant more than one or two embryos in a woman under 35. Given our experience with the extraordinary high risk of multiple pregnancies for mothers and babies, those who endanger patients ought to lose their licenses.” Goodman also writes that the infants will need “at least $1 million in neonatal care and more if they have the typical range of disabilities for premature babies.” A “reproductive business that generates so much controversy has produced a remarkable consensus,” she says, concluding, “Infertility treatment for an unemployed, single mother of six? Eight embryos in one womb? There must be a proper word in the medical literature to describe this achievement. I think the word is ‘nuts'” (Goodman, Miami Herald, 2/6).

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