Tag Archives: Single parent

The success rates of gestational surrogacy cycles

In India, especially in Mumbai, gestational surrogacy is helping many couples have children, which may not have been possible in the past.

At Rotunda, we have tripled our gestational surrogacy cycles in 2008, in conjunction with achieving exceptionally high success rates. Our success rates with fresh surrogacy cycles average around 50% per embryo transfer, and are as high as 70% per embryo transfer in cases where eggs from our young healthy donors are used.

Results of last six months’ surrogacy cycles at Rotunda:

Month (2008)

No. of Cycles

No. of Pregnancies

Pregnancy rate per transfer (%)

May

8

5

62.5

June

8

3

38.0

July

15

9

60.0

August

14

5

36.0

September

11

5

45.5

October

11

8

72.7

 

surrogacy-cycles

We understand that when a couple fails to achieve a pregnancy with surrogacy, the situation can be quite overwhelming due to the high expectation of success and the substantial drain on financial resources. Our team is always cognizant of these realities and every attempt is made to work with couples in the event of failure to help them realize their goal of building families.

Since there are potentially significant legal, financial, ethical, and psychological issues with surrogacy, couples should work with centers that have experience in selecting surrogate mothers and provide the infrastructure to deal with these issues. 

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Many women would ask a male friend to father their child

A survey of 3,103 men and women, has found that 45 per cent of women surveyed would consider asking a male friend to father their child in the absence of a suitable partner.

The report by the company reveals that both men and women have concerns about fertility issues, with two thirds of the women polled that were not in current relationships expressing doubts over their ability to conceive naturally, and 26 per cent of men voicing similar concerns.

The most intriguing trend to come out of the survey was women’s willingness to consider alternative means to conception in the absence of a suitable partner. Women between the ages of 28 and 31 were most likely to entertain the idea of turning to a male friend in absence of a partner, while half of the single female survey respondents thought about meeting a partner on a frequent basis. Many women questioned also made it clear that they would consider a ‘second best’ option in the event that they were unable to find their ‘ideal’ partner.

Psychologist Linda Papadopoulos commented on the changing social norms of parenting, which were challenging the conventional nuclear family unit. She stated that ‘reconstituted families, same sex families, and single parents are much more prevalent these days, and rather than ascribing to the ‘norm’ it seems that women and men are more flexible with their definition of ‘family”.

Posted by : Goral Gandhi, MSc,

                   Laboratory Director,

                   Rotunda – Center for Human Reproduction (Pvt) Ltd

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Fertility laws in UK drop “need for a father” in infertility treatment

Single women and lesbian couples will be able to seek fertility treatment without having to consider a father for their children. In May this year, the House of Commons in UK has rejected a proposed amendment to the new Human Fertilisation and Embryology (HFE) Bill, requiring fertility clinics to consider the ‘need for a father’ prior to IVF treatment. Under the new Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill, women seeking fertility treatment will no longer have to take into account the role of a father figure. Instead, the rules will be replaced with references to “supportive parenting”.

Section 13 of the 1990 Human Fertilisation and Embryology (HFE) Act required IVF clinics to consider the ‘welfare’ of any child that may be created, including the ‘need for a father’, prior to IVF treatment. This requirement was debated in the House of Commons and reviewed by the parliamentary Science and Technology Committee in 2006. It was suggested that the requirement discriminates against lesbian couples and single women seeking IVF treatment, but noted that clinicians and fertility counsellors recommended retaining a reference to the parenting needs of the child.

The new Bill will reflect the HFEA guidelines and will be brought into line with the Human Rights Act. Health minister Dawn Primarolo said, ‘this is about ensuring that this law reflects current practices and family setups and current legislation referring to human rights’. Emily Thornberry, the Labour MP for Islington, reiterated, ‘the important point is to give legal rights to lesbian couples and single women.’

The amendment to retain the ‘need for a father’ in the new HFE bill was proposed by former Conservative leader Iain Duncan Smith, who argued that removing the ‘need for a father’ would send a message that ‘fathers are less important than mothers’ in parenting. Labour MP Geraldine Smith appealed to ‘common sense’ in the need for a father figure. Mr Duncan Smith and his supporters said that fathers play an important role in parenting, and pointed to evidence that children from single parent families were less likely to do well at school and more likely to abuse drugs and alcohol. In practice, they said, there was little evidence that lesbian couples and single mothers were being denied fertility treatment..

The latest psychological research, discussed at a public debate hosted by the Progress Educational Trust at the House of Commons in January 2008, suggests that children benefit when a father is active in parenting, and are adversely affected when a father leaves the family. There is also much evidence that ‘solo’ single mothers by choice and lesbian couples are highly committed to parenthood and able to provide supportive parenting.

The Bill will also allow both partners in a lesbian couple to be designated parents when they conceive with donated sperm. This reflects the situation of a heterosexual couple seeking fertility treatment with donor sperm, where the man is deemed the legal father despite having no biological relation to the child. The legislation represents the greatest extension to the family rights of homosexual couples since gay adoption.

Posted by : Goral Gandhi, MSc,

                   Laboratory Director,

                   Rotunda – Center for Human Reproduction (Pvt) Ltd

 

 

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